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"The Cycle" by Jessica Ashman

I'm not really sure what to say about this film.  It is a strange mixture of light sound color and character that it is very hard to classify it.  Over all it is incredible and well worth your time watching.  If I could have watched this or something like it in Biology I would have, because that's what it plays out like, a 70's Bio flick; but done way better than any Bio film I've seen.  It is also worth noting that you should check out Jessica's Vimeo channel, where there is plenty of cool Stop Motion to check out.


There is also an awesome behind the scenes time laps that I put the link to below.
BTS Link: http://vimeo.com/61997273

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